Blog: Boris Johnson news – live: Brexit ‘will keep wages down’ as inflation soars – msnNOW

Boris Johnson fails to deny he offered Carrie Symonds top job

LIVE – Updated at 13:20

The prime minister has failed to deny he offered his lover Carrie Symonds a top job while foreign secretary, when challenged in the Commons.

Boris Johnson ducked the question – which follows an allegation that he was stopped from making his future wife his chief of staff.

As well as the trade union pay dispute, on the agenda is the Wakefield, Honiton and Tiverton by-elections.

The session comes as a damning new study claimed that Brexit will damage Britain’s competitiveness, hit productivity and dampen workers’ wages for the rest of the decade.

The Resolution Foundation think tank’s report, in collaboration with the London School of Economics, said quitting the EU would make Britain “poorer” during the 2020s.

Meanwhile, the UK inflation hit a fresh 40-year high this morning, climbing 9.1 per cent in the 12 months to May.

Elsewhere, the government has today proposed a new Bill of Rights which will allow it to ignore interim rulings from a European court and could make it easier to deport foreign offenders.

Key Points

  • European decision halting Rwanda deportation could be ignored under new Raab plans
  • Brexit will keep wages down and make UK poorer in decade ahead, study finds
  • Boris Johnson fails to deny he offered his lover Carrie Symonds a top job
  • PM calls out Starmer for Labour MPs on picket lines
  • Starmer pays tributes to candidates standing in by-elections
  • Afghan refugees scheme backlog an ‘incredible betrayal’

Watch: The full PMQs exchange between Ian Blackford and Boris Johnson

13:20 , Andy Gregory

In case you missed it, here is the full PMQs exchange between Boris Johnson and the SNP’s Ian Blackford, in which the latter said “the Tory government’s disastrous Brexit is driving wages down, pushing inflation up, and will make us poorer over the next decade”.

He accused the prime minister of “recklessly threatening a trade war at the worst possible time”, urging him to “finally come to his senses and negotiate an economic agreement with the EU” rather than “wilfully push the UK into recession”.

Mr Johnson responded that “nobody wants a trade war, nor there is any need for one”.

Raab says human rights law will be ‘subject to oversight’ by MPs

13:16 , Andy Gregory

Dominic Raab has told MPs that the government “will ensure in our Bill of Rights that any expansion of human rights law as opposed to its interpretation, is subject to proper democratic oversight” by UK MPs.

“That will reinforce our ability to for example deport more foreign national offenders and in particular those claiming ever more elastic interpretations of Article 8 and the right to family life to frustrate the deportation process,” the justice secretary said.

Boris Johnson says UK should start mining and burning coal again

13:09 , Andy Gregory

Our policy correspondent Jon Stone has more on Boris Johnson’s comments at PMQs in which he said that it “makes no sense” for Britain to be importing coal from abroad for use in steelmaking “when we have our own domestic resources”:





© Provided by The Independent


Boris Johnson says UK should start mining and burning coal again

UK courts will be ‘free to diverge from Strasbourg case law’, Raab says

13:07 , Andy Gregory

Introducing the governemnt’s new Bill of Rights, Dominic Raab says that “we have a proud tradition of freedom under the rule of law in this country and I would remind honourable members on all sides that it dates back centuries to Magna Carta, not just 1998”.

He touted the Bill of Rights as “the next chapter in the evolution and the strengthening of our human rights framework”.

The UK “intends to remain a state party on the European Convention of Human Rights, Mr Raab told MPs, adding: “It is a commonsense set of principles and the problems which we have encountered have stemmed from the elastic interpretations and the expansion absent meaningful democratic oversight, in particular as a result of the procedural framework set out in the Human Rights Act”, he said.

“And so our key objectives with reform are to reinforce those quintessentially UK-wide rights like freedom of speech – the liberty that guards all of the others – and we will also recognise the role of jury-trial, mindful of how it operates in different parts of the United Kingdom, and something which is not prevalent on the continent, but is very much part of the heritage and the pedigree of this country”.

“These liberties are part of our proud history. But they are also critical in strengthening our place in the world as an open, vibrant and rambunctious democracy.”

The government will also “strengthen the separation of powers in this country, affirming the supremacy of the Supreme Court, being explicit that the UK courts are under no obligation to follow the Strasbourg case law and indeed are free to diverge from it”, Mr Raab said.

Speaking over angry noise from the opposite benches, he added: “What else is the point of a Supreme Court if it bows in subordination to a European one?”

Watch: The full exchange between Sir Keir Starmer and Boris Johnson

12:54 , Andy Gregory

Dominic Raab is now up to talk about the new Bill of Rights which will allow government to ignore interim rulings from a European court and could make it easier to deport foreign offenders.

For those just joining us on the blog, you can watch the full PMQs exchange between Boris Johnson and Sir Keir Starmer here:

‘It makes no sense’ to import coal when UK has its own resources, Boris Johnson says

12:51 , Andy Gregory

Boris Johnson has said it “makes no sense” to be importing coal “when we have our own domestic resources”.

In the Commons, Tory MP Chris Green said that “for much of Britain levelling up means the revitalisation of British industry and the jobs that goes with it”, adding that “many countries around the world such as Germany and China get a competitive advantage by burning lignite, the dirtiest form of fossil fuel”.

He asked the prime minister whether he was concerned “about the ethics of holding back British industry and exporting and magnifying our carbon emissions overseas all in the name of net zero?”

Boris Johnson responded that he thought “we can all be proud of the way we have reduced CO2 emissions in this country”, adding: “But plainly it makes no sense to be importing coal, particularly for metallurgical purposes, when we have our own domestic resources.”

Boris Johnson tells Labour MP to ‘get off the picket line’

12:48 , Andy Gregory

Boris Johnson has told a Labour MP to get “off the picket line” if “she wants to support the working people of this country”.

Kate Osborne told the Commons that “tens of thousands of people were marching through London last weekend protesting against this out-of-touch government”, adding: “Rail workers are on strike, Royal Mail workers, NHS workers, teachers and even barristers are on the verge of taking industrial actions. All workers are struggling to cope with the worst cost-of-living crisis in history.

“Ministers are planning to boost city bosses pay whilst demanding wage restraint for everyone else. So can the prime minister tell me, when is he going to stop meaningless soundbites and instead start supporting working people across our country?”

Mr Johnson retorted: “If she wants to support the working people of this country, can I suggest she gets off the picket line … and has a word with her leader, and supports the travelling public of this country who want to see a reduction in their costs of transport, which this government is delivering.”

SNP leader asks if UK government can ‘bear any blame’ for 40-year-high inflation

12:35 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

SNP Westminster leader Ian Blackford asked the prime minister if his government “bears any blame” for the fact that the United Kingdom is doing “much worse than our European neighbours”.

Mr Blackford told the Commons UK inflation is now at a “40-year high”, adding: “After 12 years in Government, the Tories have left the UK economy in the doldrums and pushed millions of people into poverty.

“So, can I ask the prime minister, does he think his government bears any blame for the fact that the United Kingdom is doing so much worse than our European neighbours?”

Boris Johnson replied: “Actually, I think the whole House knows, and the whole country knows we have got a global inflationary problem, but this government has the fiscal firepower to deal with it.

“And that is, I think, a benefit to the whole of the United Kingdom, including Scotland as we’ve seen throughout the pandemic, and I think it’s a matter of fact that taxes are actually highest of all in Scotland.”

Schools should have ‘contingencies in place to manage’ exams during strikes

12:32 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

Regarding students undertaking their GSCE and A Level exams during the strike action this week, the prime minister said: “No exam has been cancelled as result of the stikes so far. We expect school and colleges to have contingencies in place to manage.”

Boris Johnson added that school boards should determine what to do if a student arrives late for the exam, and if an exam is missed completely due to the strikes then the grade should be calculated through other assessments.

Train strikes: Starmer vs Johnson

12:28 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer said: “The prime minister of this country and his transport secretary haven’t attended a single meeting, held a conversation or lifted a finger to stop these strikes.

“But I did note that on Monday they did find time to go to a lavish ball where the Prime Minister sold a meeting with himself for £120,000… If there’s money coming his way, he’s there.

“So rather than blame everyone else why doesn’t he do his job, get round the table and get the trains running?”

Boris Johnson replied: “We are making sure that we do everything we can to prevent these strikes. He knows it is up to the railway companies to negotiate, that is their job. We’ve spent £16 billion looking after the railways throughout the pandemic, that’s cost every household £600.

He added: “We know why he won’t condemn the strikes, we know why even now he hasn’t got the gumption to call out his MPs for going out to support the pickets. The reason his authority is on the line in this matter is that they take £10 million… that’s the fee the learned gentleman opposite is receiving for the case he is failing to make.”

Afghan refugees scheme backlog an ‘incredible betrayal’

12:25 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

Green MP Caroline Lucas has called the 23, 000 backlog on Afghan refugees scheme, where only 2 applications out of 3000 who worked for UK have been processed, an “incredible betrayal”.

The prime minister responded that Ms Lucas has “underestimated” how much the UK has done for Afghanistan.

Starmer pays tributes to candidates standing in by-elections

12:19 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer paid tribute to candidates standing in by-elections this week.

He said: “In particular, the plucky Conservative candidate for Wakefield, he is standing even though his own colleagues think he is so useless they held a vote of no confidence in him.”

As Tory MPs looked on puzzled, Sir Keir added: “Does the Prime Minister hold any personal interest in seeing if the public will vote for a Tory that even his own side don’t think is up to it?”

Mr Johnson replied: “I have absolutely no doubt that the people of this country and the people of Wakefield, and the people of Tiverton and Honiton would much rather vote for a solid Conservative Government than for a Labour Party, their enablers and acolytes in the Liberal Democrats, the karma chameleons of British politics.”

The Prime Minister added that Sir Keir “hasn’t even got the gumption to speak out against the rail strikes”.

Starmer questions PM on increasing pay cuts and taxes

12:17 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

Labour’s Keir Starmer calls out prime minster on pay cuts and taxes.

He said: “Working people are paying more taxes and now they are told to take a pay cut… Why is he focused on increasing bankers pay than the pay off those that are running the country?”

Boris Johnson fails to deny he offered his lover Carrie Symonds a top job

12:11 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

Boris Johnson has failed to deny he offered his lover Carrie Symonds a top job while foreign secretary, when challenged in the Commons.

The prime minister ducked the question – which follows an allegation that he was stopped from making his future wife his chief of staff.





© Provided by The Independent


Boris Johnson fails to deny he offered his lover Carrie Symonds a top job

PM calls our Starmer for Labour MPs on picket lines

12:09 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

Prime minister called our Labour’s Keir Starmer for having 25 MPs out on the picket line “backing the strikers, while we back the strivers.

Starmer responded that Mr Johnson “has not lifted a finger” to stop the strikes.

Prime minister deters from question about Carriegate

12:06 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

Responding to a question about Carrie Symonds being offered a job, Boris Johnson said: “I know why the party opposite wants to talk about non-existent jobs in the media, because they don’t want to talk about what’s going on in the real world.

“I’m proud to say actually that we now have 620,000 more people in payrolled in employment than before the pandemic began, which would never have been possible if we’d listened to the right honourable gentleman opposite!”

Prime minister deflects Carriegate question

12:04 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

Responding to a question that the prime minister address Carriegate, Mr Johnson said the opposition would rather speak about issues in the media than “real world” problems.

PMQs begins

12:03 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

Boris Johnson stands as today’s session of PMQs begins.

Business leaders urge government to prevent ‘summer of discontent’

11:55 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

Business leaders have urged the government to resolve a dispute over railway workers’ pay and conditions after strikes caused travel chaos that is set to continue all week.

Pub bosses warned a “summer of discontent” would hammer the industry and inevitably result in another wave of closures, just as firms begin to recover from a nightmare two years of lockdowns and restrictions.

Small businesses and the self-employed were impacted hardest by nationwide while hospitality firms are expected to take a £1bn hit this week as Britons cancel outings, Ben Chapman writes.





© Provided by The Independent


Business leaders urge government to resolve rail strikes

Sajid Javed calls rail strikes ‘unjustified’

11:43 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

Health Secretary Sajid Javid has branded the railway workers’ strikes as “unjustified”.

Speaking at a visit to St George’s Hospital on Wednesday, he said: “Well, I think, and I hope actually that the rail workers are quite unique in how they’ve responded to higher inflation because I think their strike is just just completely unjustified.

“It is right that we look to modernise our rail services, it is right we take into account perhaps the longer term impacts of the pandemic with the changing patterns of the way people work.

“I think people recognise also that during the pandemic, the Government put in billions of pounds, I think, some £16 billion of extra support for the rail industry. That’s something like £600 per family in the UK. But that can’t be continued.

“We need to recognise this and make a changes and think this strike is unjustified and it’s hurting a lot of people, particularly people trying to get to hospital for their appointments and also you have NHS staff trying to get to the hospitals to help them.”

Health secretary says new Bill of Rights is about ‘delivering on our promise’

11:26 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

Sajid Javid said “it’s right that UK law is supreme” with a new Bill of Rights.

The health secretary said: “I think that this bill that we’ve announced today is all about delivering on our promise, which is that UK courts should have supremacy when it comes to law for our country, our citizens. And that’s what this really is about at its heart and I think the most people would respect that.

“I remember when I was home secretary how my attempts, for example, to remove your foreign national offenders from the UK that were murderers or convicted paedophiles, to remove them out of the country once they served their sentence were frustrated with the current approach and I think it’s right that UK law is supreme.”

Brexit: Ministers warned against trade deal with Gulf states over ‘appalling’ human rights record

11:11 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

Boris Johnson’s government has been warned against a post-Brexit free trade deal with a group Gulf states over the “appalling” record on human rights.

Union chiefs and campaigners urged ministers to rethink its approach as talks on a deal between the UK and six Gulf nations kick off on Wednesday in Saudi Arabia.

International trade secretary Anne-Marie Trevelyan will meet representatives of the Gulf Co-operation Council (GCC) in Riyadh to begin negotiations with the bloc, writes Adam Forrest.





© Provided by The Independent


UK warned against trade deal with Gulf states over ‘appalling’ human rights record

Sunak says Bank of England will act ‘forcefully’ to tackle inflation

10:56 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

Rishi Sunak said the government and the Bank of England were acting to combat rising inflation which hit a 40-year-high this morning.

Asked if the Bank had lost control of inflation, which is meant to be kept at a target of 2%, the chancellor said: “I want people to be reassured that we have all the tools we need and the determination to reduce inflation and to bring it back down.

“Firstly, the Bank of England will act forcefully to combat inflation.

“Secondly, the Government will be responsible with borrowing and debt so we don’t make the situation worse and drive up people’s mortgage rates any more than they are going to go up.

“Lastly, we are improving the productivity of our economy, improving the supply of energy we have and moving people off welfare and into work.”

Home Office top employee says nothing department loves more than a ‘good crisis’

10:40 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

Top Home Office civil servant Matthew Rycroft said there is nothing the department “loves better than a good crisis”.

Asked about a point previously raised by the independent chief inspector of borders and immigration, David Neal, that there “always seems to be a crisis going on” in the Home Office, Mr Rycroft told the Commons Home Affairs Committee: “I absolutely recognise that.”

He added: “You may recall when the home secretary and I set up a transformation programme for the Home Office, called One Home Office, one of the things that we were seeking to unlock was the sense in the department that we do go from crisis to crisis.

“You know, there’s nothing that the Home Office loves better than a good crisis. And of course, responding well to crises is an important part of the functioning of a department of state. But there is a lot more to it than that.

“And what I am seeking to do is to get us better at dealing with business as usual, and preventing things from becoming crises.”

Bus drivers to go on strike over pay dispute

10:26 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

Hundreds of bus drivers are to go on strike in a dispute over pay.

Members of the Unite union employed by Stagecoach in Merseyside will walk out on June 30 and again on July 4.

Unite general secretary Sharon Graham said: “Stagecoach is a highly profitable company – it can easily afford to pay its workers a decent wage but it is choosing not to.

“Unite will always challenge employers who make excessive profits by exploiting and underpaying workers. Our members will receive Unite’s complete support until this dispute is resolved.”

Unite regional officer Dave Roberts said: “Members of Unite are taking strike action as a last resort. Despite extensive negotiations, Stagecoach has refused to make an offer which meets members’ expectations.

“Even at this late stage, strikes and the inevitable disruption they will cause can be avoided if Stagecoach makes a reasonable pay offer.”

Government had to ‘hold the line’ against RMT demands, deputy PM says

10:12 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

Dominic Raab said the government had to “hold the line” against the RMT’s demands for improved pay and conditions on the railways.

The justice secretary said the strikes were “deeply regrettable” and reform was necessary on the railways.

“We’ve, of course, got to reform the way the railways operate, given the new ways to working on the effect that has on commuter travel,” he told LBC Radio. “But there are also old practices, which frankly, are well out of date and unnecessary, which need to be reformed.”

He added: “I think Network Rail are taking the right approach. We know that the cost of living challenge is there, we know that it affects workers across the board.

“But the one thing that will keep inflation higher for longer and undermine pay packets for longer is if we have spiralling public sector pay increases beyond what is responsible. And that’s what’s at issue here.

“It is precisely to protect the wages of those on the lowest incomes that we need to hold the line.”

Teacher union threatens strike action if government fails to offer ‘inflation plus’ pay rise

09:57 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

The country’s biggest education union will consult members on industrial action this autumn if the government fails to make an “inflation-plus” pay increase for teachers.

In a letter to Nadhim Zahawi – seen by The Independent – the joint general secretaries of the National Education Union (NEU), warn they will not stand by “while you run both education and educators into the ground”.

It comes amid the biggest industrial strike on the rail network for decades and the latest figures showing UK inflation hitting a fresh 40 year high, climbing 9.1 per cent in the 12 months to May — up from 9 per cent in April.

Our political correspondent Ashley Cowburn reports:





© Provided by The Independent


Teacher union threatens strike if government fails to offer ‘inflation plus’ pay rise

Inflation: Raab defends restoring pensions triple lock

09:41 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

Deputy prime minister Dominic Raab defended restoring the pensions triple lock, which will see the benefit rise in line with inflation, at a time when the government is arguing against wages keeping pace with rising prices.

He told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: “They (pensioners) are particularly vulnerable and they are disproportionately affected by the increase in energy costs which we know everyone is facing.”

The Government had committed £37 billion to help people cope with rising costs, he said, but “at the same time we have got to stop making the problem worse by fuelling pay demands that will only see inflation stay higher for longer and that only hurts the poorest the worst”.

London mayor calls for free NHS care for all UK residents to help ‘prevent another Windrush scandal’

09:26 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

The Mayor of London has urged the government to make for the NHS access free for everyone living in the UK to prevent another Windrush scandal.

As the nation observes Windrush Day, Sadiq Khan urged the government to end its hostile environment policy and curb NHS charging regulations for migrants, which impact undocumented Londoners as they struggle to prove their immigration status to get free healthcare.

This policy disproportionately affects patients from Black, Asian and Ethnic Minority backgrounds and ending it would prevent a repeat of the situation that saw members of the Windrush Generation being charged for treatment – or denied – the mayor argues.

Our race correspondent Nadine White reports:





© Provided by The Independent


London mayor calls for free NHS care for all UK residents on Windrush Day

Brexit will keep wages down and make UK poorer in decade ahead, study finds

09:09 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

Brexit will damage Britain’s competitiveness, hit productivity and dampen workers’ wages for the rest of the decade, according to a damning new study.

The Resolution Foundation think tank’s report, in collaboration with the London School of Economics, said quitting the EU would make Britain “poorer” during the 2020s.

The study said the immediate impact of Brexit was already clear, with a “depreciation-driven inflation spike” increasing the cost of living for households and cutting investment.

Politics writer Adam Forrest has more:





© Provided by The Independent


Brexit will keep wages down and make UK poorer, study finds

Government cannot allow ‘militant’ unions to ‘win argument’, Dominic Raab says

08:50 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

Dominic Raab has said the government cannot “relent” and allow striking rail workers to “win” the argument amid the biggest industrial action on the network in three decades.

Risking a fresh clash, the deputy prime minister also described the actions of the country’s largest rail union, RMT, as “militant” — just minutes after insisting the government did not want the dispute to become “politicised”.

As inflation hit a fresh 40 year high, the cabinet minister said it showed the need to take a “firm line” with the union, telling Sky News there was a risk of a “vicious cycle” of rising wages pushing inflation even higher.

Our political correspondent Ashley Cowburn has more:





© Provided by The Independent


Government cannot allow unions to ‘win argument’ over pay, Dominic Raab says

Dominic Raab says new Bill will restore ‘common sense’ to the system

08:34 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

Deputy prime minister Dominic Raab insisted human rights would be protected by new legislation which allows the Government to ignore interim rulings from a European court and could make it easier to deport foreign offenders.

Mr Raab, the Justice Secretary, told LBC Radio the Bill of Rights measures would see “common sense” restored to the system.

He said: “No one is talking about tearing about human rights in this country. We are staying in the European Convention, we are going to reinforce those quintessentially British rights like free speech.

“But I do think, when it comes to public protection, people want to see a dose of common sense and balance provided, that’s what our reforms will achieve.”

Deputy PM says new bill of rights will ‘curb abuses’

08:14 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

Speaking about the new bill of rights proposed today that will allow UK courts to ignore rulings from the European Court of Human Rights, Dominic Raab said the reforms will “strengthen free speech and curb the abuses” of human rights.

“We’ve seen a lot of elastic interpretations of human rights – particularly fuelled by the Human Rights Act – and we think it’s right to have a proper separation of powers,” the justice secretary added.

“The UK Supreme court should do what it says on the tin- be Supreme in the legal interpretations.”

Labour MP says government needs to understand the ‘scale’ of cost of living crisis

08:02 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

Labour’s shadow culture secretary Lucy Powell said the government needs to act according to the “scale” of the cost of living crisis.

Speaking on BBC Breakfast about the new 40-year-high inflation mark that was reported this morning, the Labour MP said: “It won’t be a suprise for most people who see those price rises at the petrol pumps, the supermarkets and feeling it everyday.”

See more here:

Deputy PM says we must show ‘pay restraint’ to stop inflation from rising

07:47 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

Dominic Raab has said that “pay restraint” must be shown in the public sector to avoid the “vicious cycle of inflation”.

Speaking to Sky News this morning, he said: “We know that if public sector pay keeps going up, it will only keep inflation high for longer.”

The deputy prime minister added that we are facing a “global struggle” with inflation.

Watch more here:

Inflation hits fresh 40-year high as cost of living crisis deepens

07:31 , Maryam Zakir-Hussain

UK inflation, the rate at which prices rise, climbed 9.1 per cent in the 12 months to May, a fresh 40 year high.

The ongoing surge is partly driven by energy costs, after an increase of £700 a-year in energy bills came into force last month.

Yet economists fear inflation will climb further in the months ahead, with the Bank of England estimating it could reach 11 per cent this year.

Anna Isaac reports:





© Provided by The Independent


Inflation hits fresh 40-year high as cost of living crisis deepens

No 10 attempts to override ECHR ruling and rail strikes dominate front pages today

07:05 , Stuti Mishra

Wednesday’s front pages splash on deserted train stations as rail staff begin the first day of their scheduled strikes. Meanwhile, the war of words between unions, Labour and the government over industrial action also makes to the lead stories.

Unions have accused Boris Johnson of pursing a “race to the bottom” by heading off public sector pay hikes as teachers and postal workers threaten action, The Independent says on the front page.

Elsewhere, The Guardian leads with a report that Downing Street will set out sweeping plans to override the power of Europe’s human rights court after a judge blocked the UK from deporting asylum seekers to Rwanda. The Tory bill has been accused of “fatally weakening human rights” by campaigners and lawyers.

See more front pages here:





© Provided by The Independent


What the papers say – June 22

No 10 defends inflation-busting rise for pensioners but not public workers

06:32 , Stuti Mishra

Downing Street has defended reinstating the triple lock on pensions while insisting that public sector workers receiving pay rises in line with inflation would further stoke rising costs.

Retirees are set to see double-digit payments increases next year as the state pension will be determined based on September’s CPI inflation.

Asked why state pensions will rise with inflation but not public sector pay, the prime minister’s official spokesman said: “Pensioners, particularly those who receive state pensions, are disproportionately impacted by high energy costs.

Read more:





© Provided by The Independent


No 10 defends inflation-busting rise for pensioners but not public workers

Emily Thornberry says government acting ‘drunk’ in ECHR debate

06:00 , Stuti Mishra

Shadow attorney-general Emily Thornberry has slammed the government over the proposed new Bill of Rights and questioned whether the move would actually change anything, or rather add “more and more layers of bureaucracy on the application of the Human Rights Act”, so it will merely “gum up the system”.

She accused the government of “behaving like some sort of drunk” calling for a fight over the policy.

“They’re just trying to think of anything that they can take on at the moment in order to distract us all from what’s really happening, which is their inability to govern – they’re trying to pick yet another fight,” she told the BBC.

European decision halting Rwanda deportation could be ignored under new Raab plans

05:49 , Stuti Mishra

European Court of Human Rights decisions blocking removal flights to Rwanda would be ignored under a Bill of Rights also tasked with increasing deportations of foreign criminals.

Dominic Raab is introducing the proposed legislation to parliament on Wednesday after the Strasbourg court disrupted the government’s controversial flagship policy for asylum seekers who arrive in unauthorised journeys.

The deputy prime minister wants the successor to the Human Rights Act to assert that British courts do not always need to follow case law from Strasbourg and that the supreme court in London is the ultimate decision-maker on human rights issues.

And the legislation would confirm that interim measures such as the one issued over the Rwanda policy are not binding on UK courts.

Read more:





© Provided by The Independent


European decisions halting Rwanda deportations could be ignored under Raab plans

05:11 , Stuti Mishra

Welcome to The Independent’s live coverage of all the latest in UK politics. Stay tuned!

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